Edith Clarke, the first professionally employed female electrical engineer in America, has been added to the US National Inventors Hall of Fame alongside Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell as part of the 2015 class of inductees
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Ground-breaking electrical engineer, Edith Clarke (1883 – 1959), has been posthumously inducted into the US National Inventors Hall of Fame as part of the 2015 class of inductees.

Clarke has been inducted alongside the likes of Thomas Edison, the Wright brothers and Alexander Graham Bell, fifty-six years after her death in 1956.She is best known for inventing a graphical calculator that simplified the calculations necessary to determine the electrical characteristics of long electrical transmission lines.

Clarke spent much of her career between AT&T and General Electric (GE).  At AT&T, she assisted fellow National Inventors ‘Hall of Famer’ George Campbell, learning about transmission lines and electrical circuits.

At GE, she invented her calculator along with other ways to improve the electrical distribution system. After retiring from GE, she was appointed to the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin.

Throughout her career, Clarke regularly led the way for female engineers. She was the first professionally employed female American electrical engineer, the first female full voting member of what would become the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and the first full-time female professor of electrical engineering in America.

http://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/EdithClarke3-e1424255591692.jpghttp://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/EdithClarke3-e1424255591692.jpgDavid O'RiordanNewselectricity,electronics,innovation,United States
  Ground-breaking electrical engineer, Edith Clarke (1883 - 1959), has been posthumously inducted into the US National Inventors Hall of Fame as part of the 2015 class of inductees. Clarke has been inducted alongside the likes of Thomas Edison, the Wright brothers and Alexander Graham Bell, fifty-six years after her death...