This year, according to research firm IDC, $1.7 trillion will be spent on digital transformation projects around the world
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Digital transformation has captured the imagination. And the CFO’s attention. This year, according to research firm IDC, $1.7 trillion will be spent on digital transformation projects around the world. Despite the money being spent, companies are struggling to get it right. Forbes Magazine calculates that most digital transformation projects fail. Companies are compelled, however, to persevere.

Businesses don’t transform by choice because it’s risky and expensive. They’ve been left with no choice, though. The world is moving so quickly if you don’t engage in digitising your business, you risk extinction or being “Amazoned”, and this applies to old-world industry sectors like engineering and construction.

At Cora Systems, our business is technology so we’ve helped firms like Honeywell Building Solutions and WSP (as well as clients from other sectors such as Allergan Pharmaceuticals with their recent capital expenditure project in Co Mayo, Ireland) to manage their digital transformation implementations. They’re wide in scale. Take our work with Honeywell Building Solutions, for example.

“Cora gives us a single version of the truth. We’ve got more than 50+ countries in which we work, with 10,000 to 12,000 people in our part of Honeywell, which is only one part of Honeywell. We’re a $4 billion organization. We have in the region of 26,000 live projects every day. Cora has insight into all those projects,” explains Phil Howe, Project Management Excellence Leader – Europe, Honeywell Building Solutions.

Planning and consultation


At Cora Systems, we plan up front and consult each step of the way with clients because these organisation-wide implementations with a client like Honeywell involves significant cultural change. You have to get buy-in from staff, explaining to them the rationale for change, setting clear goals and delivering with a good communications strategy. To ensure successful implementation, it’s vital from the client side that their software solution must be configurable.

In a large organization like Honeywell, for example, we recognize that change management is really only about 50% of the overall solution. It’s why we’ve made our product highly configurable. In an organization like Honeywell’s division, which has 12,000 people, you could have a Honeywell project manager dealing with a $3,000 project or another colleague who is dealing with a $300 million-valued project. Those two people don’t have to go through the same level of governance, even though there has to be proper governance for each spend.

The way in which we cater for this with our Cora PPM solution is to minimise the level of change required on the client’s end. We’re not asking them to change the way they’re managing their projects. We’ve configured our product so they can use it the way that suits them best to manage their projects. The key is to give this consolidated view of projects – in Honeywell’s case reducing their view from 22 systems to a single view – right throughout their whole organization. That’s a huge benefit to a client like Honeywell.

Philip Martin is CEO of Cora Systems. To register for the Cora Systems-sponsored “Powering Transformation: People, Processes and Technology” seminar, Engineers Ireland, 22 Clyde Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4 (9am-1pm, Feb 21), see: http://bit.ly/PeopleProcessesTech

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Digital transformation has captured the imagination. And the CFO’s attention. This year, according to research firm IDC, $1.7 trillion will be spent on digital transformation projects around the world. Despite the money being spent, companies are struggling to get it right. Forbes Magazine calculates that most digital transformation projects...