The OECD estimates 57% of adults in Ireland have no ICT skills or have only the skills necessary to fulfil the simplest set of tasks in a technology-rich environment
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Among the challenges facing the Irish economy, the OECD estimates that 57 per cent of adults in Ireland have no ICT skills or have only the skills necessary to fulfil the simplest set of tasks in a technology-rich environment, stakeholders at a government-organised ‘Future Jobs’ event have heard.

Additionally, a recent OECD study estimated that the average Irish worker faced a 46 per cent probability of being automated by the 2030s.

With unemployment falling from a high of 16 per cent to 5.1 per cent and 385,700 new jobs created since 2012, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar TD together with his cabinet colleagues Minister Humphreys TD and Minister Paschal Donohoe TD, met with 160 key stakeholders in Dublin on ‘Future Jobs’, the government’s new plan to guide the next phase of Ireland’s economic development.

Employment levels welcomed


While employment levels are to be welcomed, there are now new constraints on the economy, while international developments like Brexit and new technologies mean that jobs and business models must adapt.

Based around a number of pillars, Future Jobs 2019 will focus on about 20 targeted actions around themes including productivity, skills and talent, innovation and technology, participation and a low carbon economy.

The summit featured two keynote speeches from Luiz de Mello, director, OECD, on ‘Ireland’s Productivity Challenge’ and Julie Spillane, Accenture, on ‘Ireland’s Future Economy Technology, Talent and Emerging Opportunities’.

An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said: “Today’s school children will be doing jobs that don’t currently exist. At the same time our planet is under pressure from climate change and other challenges. New forms of energy, transport and food production will transform industries, companies and jobs. Future Jobs is about positioning us now to embrace these big changes.

“The Future Jobs strategy sets out longer term ambitions for the future of the economy, taking account of the challenges facing us, then translating these into a small number of impactful and deliverable actions which can be taken on an annual basis, starting in 2019.

Accountability for delivery of these actions


“There will be accountability for delivery of these actions, overseen personally by me and by my department. The next few decades will involve great change and opportunity. If Ireland is to adapt to and continue to thrive, we must start preparing now for tomorrow’s economy.”

Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation Heather Humphreys TD said: “We need to ask ourselves hard questions about areas where we need to improve. This includes looking at how we can increase productivity levels among our indigenous SMEs.

“As we reach full employment, our focus needs to adjust from getting people back to work to ensuring that we are creating sustainable jobs.”

http://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/a-aaaaball1-1024x768.jpghttp://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/a-aaaaball1-300x300.jpgDavid O'RiordanNewsICT,Ireland,jobs
Among the challenges facing the Irish economy, the OECD estimates that 57 per cent of adults in Ireland have no ICT skills or have only the skills necessary to fulfil the simplest set of tasks in a technology-rich environment, stakeholders at a government-organised 'Future Jobs' event have heard. Additionally, a...