Met Éireann is building an operational Flood Forecast Centre for fluvial and coastal floods, and is recruiting hydrometeorologists and looking for hydrological models and integrator systems suitable for real-time flood forecasting
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Met Éireann, the Irish national meteorological service, is building an operational Flood Forecast Centre (FFC) for fluvial and coastal floods.

Following widespread flooding across Ireland in December 2015/January 2016, the government decided to establish a National Flood Forecast and Warning Service (NFFWS). Met Éireann is working with the Office of Public Works (OPW) to make this a reality.

The NFFWS will incorporate the operational FFC in Met Éireann with guidance for standards and performance overseen by the OPW.

Met Éireann wishes to issue two invitations to the engineering community and beyond. First: take a look at the hydrometeorologist jobs we’ve advertised and apply if you’d like to work in the new FFC at our Dublin headquarters.

Second: let us know if you have hydrological models and integrator systems suitable for real-time flood forecasting. We are doing a study to review, develop and trial models suitable for operational forecasting for five representative catchments around Ireland and integrator systems suitable for real-time flood forecasting.

Hydrometeorologists wanted – your country needs you!


We recently recruited a chief hydrometeorologist and we are now recruiting hydrometeorologists to work in a position which will be a mix of operational flood forecasting, development of hydrological and coastal flood forecasting models, and managing dissemination of Met Éireann Flood Forecast Centre products. The jobs will be varied and interesting, and you will be involved in building a national flood forecasting system from the early stages.

We need people with:
• Experience of the development, calibration and operation of flood forecasting models and services;
• A qualification of at least Level 8 (BSc Hons) on the National Framework of Qualifications in one or more of the following: Hydrology, Oceanography, Meteorology or where Hydrology was taken as a major component, for example, Civil Engineering, Earth and Environmental Sciences.

The job information booklet and link to the application system are available here. The closing date for applications is June 7, 2018. This is an established (permanent) post subject to successful completion of a probationary contract of one year from appointment date. Further details can be found in the information booklet.

Hydrological models and integrator systems for operational fluvial flood forecasting in Ireland wanted


To help us equip the Flood Forecast Centre for its fluvial forecasting task, we have decided to undertake a study of a range of existing available hydrological models and integrator systems. They will be reviewed, developed and trialled for operational fluvial flood forecasting use in Ireland.

The study was awarded to IMDC, an engineering company experienced in hydrological modelling and forecasting systems. The study started in April 2018 and will last until October 2019. It contains the following stages:
1.) Comprehensive literature review of existing hydrological models.
2.) Comprehensive literature review of existing integrator systems. An integrator system combines a hydrological model with real-time observed and forecasted data, starts new simulations, facilitates the visualisation of model input and output, triggers alerts and disseminates information to relevant stakeholders.
3.) Model development for five representative catchments: Shannon, Barrow, Nore, Slaney and Moy and Killalla.
4.) Trialling of hydrological models for fluvial flood forecasting. Models are tested on five representative catchments.
5.) Trialling of integrator systems for fluvial flood forecasting, including a two-month pre-operational test.

Based on the literature review, three hydrological models and three integrator systems will be selected for further development and trialled on the five representative catchments. Each model is first calibrated and validated, and then tested both with historic data and with real-time forecast data from a number of meteorological data sets.

The target forecast accuracy is expressed in terms of advance warning time and flow magnitude. A model should predict the actual peak flow to within +/- 10 per cent and six hours of the actual peak at the gauged forecast points, and with a lead time of greater than 24 hours.

More details can be found on: https://www.met.ie/review-of-hydrological-models

Submissions from providers


Providers of hydrological models and integrators systems suitable for real-time flood forecasting are kindly invited to get in contact with Met Éireann. Suitable models and integrator systems will then be included in the literature review. Your submission should reach us by June 15, 2018.

Please email: hydroreview@met.ie

http://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/a-flda.bmphttp://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/a-flda-300x300.bmpDavid O'RiordanNewsflooding,jobs,water
Met Éireann, the Irish national meteorological service, is building an operational Flood Forecast Centre (FFC) for fluvial and coastal floods. Following widespread flooding across Ireland in December 2015/January 2016, the government decided to establish a National Flood Forecast and Warning Service (NFFWS). Met Éireann is working with the Office of...