The Atlantic University Alliance develops and delivers courses with a unique technology focus, aimed at addressing current and future requirements of the high-tech sector
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Ronan O’Sullivan of CompuStaff

Ronan O’Sullivan of CompuStaff

It is becoming increasingly difficult to fill job vacancies in quality, regulatory affairs and automation, according to Ronan O’Sullivan of CompuStaff, which specialises in recruiting for the high tech sector.

“I also see a preference among employers for people who had a career in one area and who have retrained, as they then have a greater ability for idea generation, critical thinking and creativity. Every time you upskill, you move further up the ladder.”

Ongoing upskilling and learning has been shown to contribute to the chances of gaining promotion in the high-tech sector.

Nuala McGuinn, Director of the Centre for Adult Learning and Professional Development at NUI Galway

Nuala McGuinn, director of the Centre for Adult Learning and Professional Development at NUI Galway

Nuala McGuinn, director of the Centre for Adult Learning and Professional Development at NUI Galway, highlights that “while acknowledging that employability and market competitiveness is key for all employers, from a wider societal view, the positive effects of lifelong learning in terms of personal development and higher levels of job satisfaction and greater staff retention make economic sense.”

Those in the high-tech sector, interested in giving themselves an edge in employability and career development, should consider upskilling through courses with a strategic focus on science and technology. This is the remit of a collaborative initiative of three of Ireland’s leading Universities: NUI Galway, the University of Limerick and University College Cork. They have come together, under the auspices of the Atlantic University Alliance (AUA), to jointly develop and deliver courses with a unique technology focus, offered on a part-time blended learning basis suitable for working adults.

The Programme in Science and Technology Studies was developed by academic staff in consultation with industry, specifically to address current and future requirements of the high-tech sector. It offers a comprehensive range of over 50 science, technology and management modules so participants can focus on areas that are relevant to their career path. These include modules such as: Operations Engineering or Design of Engineering Systems at level 7, Automation and Control or Regulatory Compliance at level 8, and Product Design and Development or Managing Innovation at master’s level.

Conscious of the many demands placed on adult learners from a work and family perspective, all of the courses were developed on a modular basis to provide manageable, bite-sized chunks of learning, enabling participants to combine work and family commitments with the demands of studying. This is particularly useful for continuous professional development; for deepening niche understanding and refreshing skills; or for those wishing to break into new areas of employment.

To find out more about all AUA courses visit www.aua.ie, where there are details on how to apply for a course in the next academic year starting in August 2018

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It is becoming increasingly difficult to fill job vacancies in quality, regulatory affairs and automation, according to Ronan O’Sullivan of CompuStaff, which specialises in recruiting for the high tech sector. “I also see a preference among employers for people who had a career in one area and who have retrained,...