The Institution of Gas Engineers and Managers is hosting a one-day conference in September to discuss the contribution gas and its infrastructure can make to a low-carbon energy future for Ireland
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The Irish energy industry has been set a huge challenge. The government’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80 per cent of 1990 levels by 2050, detailed in its white paper ‘Ireland’s Transition to a Low Carbon Energy Future 2015-2030’ (PDF) presents a mammoth task for our industry.

How will we continue to deliver safe, affordable and reliable heat, power and transport to millions of customers each year while minimising the impact of this major environmental commitment?

In response to this conundrum, the Institution of Gas Engineers and Managers (IGEM) has put together a one-day conference to discuss the contribution gas and its infrastructure can make to a low-carbon energy future for Ireland.

On Wednesday 13 September, representatives from government, regulators, academia and the gas supply chain will meet at the Grand Hotel in Malahide, Dublin, to discuss:

  • Decarbonising the existing gas network;
  • The potential of alternative gases and the practicalities of using them;
  • How variable gas quality impacts on the supply chain;
  • Proposed changes to legislation to allow new ways of working.

IGEM CEO Sarb Bajwa said: “Historically, our gas networks have done a stellar job of transporting natural gas to our homes and businesses. But a low-carbon economy doesn’t spell the end for this essential and reliable infrastructure. Let’s change our way of thinking and adapt the network we already have, using a number of alternative energy sources, to bring about a cleaner and greener future for Ireland.”

This change in thinking has already resulted in a wave of innovation within the UK’s gas grid. A number of potentially game changing projects will be covered during the day and, in her keynote address, IGEM president Sheila Lauchlan will detail the lessons learnt so far within UK gas.

The UK projects that will be showcased include:

  • H21 Leeds City Gate – Northern Gas Networks project’s to determine the economic and technical feasibility of converting the natural gas network of Leeds, one of the UK’s biggest cities to 100 per cent hydrogen;
  • Opening up the gas market – SGN’s project to demonstrate that gas with a wider range of Wobbe Index can be transported and utilised safety, in order to open up the gas market incorporating supplies from more diverse sources;
  • The renewable Cornwall study by Wales & West Utilities that created a detailed energy simulator to manage supply and demand across electricity and gas networks;
  • Black bag waste – Cadent’s construction of a new green energy plant that will be the world’s first commercially viable facility to convert household waste to a green gas called bio-substitute natural gas (BioSNG) – which emits 80 per cent less carbon dioxide than the diesel used widely in the UK;
  • Sewage into gas – Northumbrian Water’s project creating gas from sewage treatment for the national grid, having generated electricity for the past three years.

These exciting projects will be supported by network operator Gas Networks Ireland, presenting their vision of future gas provision and the development of compressed natural gas (CNG) infrastructure in Ireland.

IGEM president Sheila Lauchlan said: “The fact that this conference is sponsored by Gas Networks Ireland, RPS, Murphy and Fingleton White and is supported by the Department of Communications, Climate Action & Environment, the Commission for Energy Regulation and the Pipeline Industries Guild represents a commitment from a wide range of sources to the achievement of the climate change goal. This will be essential if we’re to achieve a whole systems approach to energy.”

If you have a vested interest in the future of the energy sector in Ireland, then please join us. For further details and booking, please visit bit.ly/FutureofGas.

http://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/poolbeg.pnghttp://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/poolbeg-300x300.pngJames HarringtonSponsoredconference,gas,infrastructure
The Irish energy industry has been set a huge challenge. The government’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80 per cent of 1990 levels by 2050, detailed in its white paper ‘Ireland’s Transition to a Low Carbon Energy Future 2015-2030’ (PDF) presents a mammoth task for...