New jobs to come on stream within five years, with engineering sector set to play a significant part, according to a report by the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs

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Ireland’s burgeoning marine economy could create up to 10,000 jobs by 2020, a recently published report has predicted.

The report, ‘A Study of the Current and Future Skills Requirements of the Marine/Maritime Economy to 2020’, carried out by the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN), says engineers will have a significant part to play as the marine economy expands.

At present, there are a little more than 16,000 people employed in the sector at various marine and coastal locations throughout the country.   The roles will be spread across key sectors and range from managerial and professional to operatives, including engineers, marine biologists, environmental scientists, naval architects and technicians.

While no major skills shortages were identified, engineering was recognised as one of the main areas that would be in demand. While most roles are not exclusive to a marine environment – electrical and mechanical engineers, for example – with a top-up qualification or training an individual’s skills can be ‘marinised’ to enable them to work in a marine or offshore environment.

The report stated that measures would have to be implemented to attract and upskill younger workers to the sector. Currently, operatives and low-skill roles are a key component of the marine economy but there is evidence of a shift towards employing more professionals. Along with the seafood sector, engineers are required in the areas of marine renewable energy and maritime monitoring.

Una Halligan, chairperson of the EGFSN, highlighted Ireland’s location as key to it taking advantage of the potential of the global marine economy by creating sustainable employment: “With our position on the western periphery of Europe facing the Atlantic Ocean and its energy resources, our deep water ports and our 7,500km coastline, Ireland is well placed to capitalise on the growing potential of the global marine economy and create sustainable jobs in the coastal regions,” she said.

“However, an important aspect will be the co-ordinated effort on the part of all the marine sectors to raise awareness of the excellent and rewarding careers in the sector and attracting people to the opportunities available,” Halligan concluded. The full report and its recommendations are available here.

http://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Marine.jpghttp://www.engineersjournal.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Marine-300x300.jpgDavid O'RiordanNewselectrical,Ireland,jobs,marine
  Ireland’s burgeoning marine economy could create up to 10,000 jobs by 2020, a recently published report has predicted. The report, ‘A Study of the Current and Future Skills Requirements of the Marine/Maritime Economy to 2020’, carried out by the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN), says engineers will have...